Beaver County AA


PI/PCP(Public Information/Cooperation with the Professional Community)

Chairperson Char F. District 25

Your service committee can bring the A.A. message to professionals and to students at professional schools in your community, helping them to understand how and why A.A. works.
A.A. has always valued friends in all professional fields. These associations have been mutually beneficial and completely in keeping with the A.A. Traditions.
Origin and Purpose of C.P.C.
“Our Twelfth Step—carrying the message—is the basic service that the A.A.
Fellowship gives; this is our principal aim and the main reason for our existence. Therefore, A.A. is more than a set of principles; it is a society for alcoholics in action. We must carry the message, else we ourselves can wither and those who haven’t been given the truth may die.”
The A.A. Service Manual, “A.A.’s Legacy of Service” p. S1
C.P.C. came into being as a distinct entity in 1970 when the trustees’ committee was formed as an outgrowth of the Public Information Committee. In 1971, the Conference C.P.C. Committee was established. Today, many local communities, areas, and regions consider C.P.C. an activity separate from public information, treatment or
corrections work. In some places, though, there is overlap.
Members of C.P.C. committees inform professionals and future professionals about A.A.— what we are, where we are, what we can do, and what we cannot do. They attempt to establish better communication between A.A.s and professionals, and to find simple, effective ways of cooperating without affiliating.


Origin and Purpose of C.P.C. “Our Twelfth Step—carrying the message—is the basic service that the A.A. Fellowship gives; this is our principal aim and the main reason for our existence. Therefore, A.A. is more than a set of principles; it is a society for alcoholics in action. We must carry the message, else we ourselves can wither and those who haven’t been given the truth may die.” The A.A. Service Manual, “A.A.’s Legacy of Service” p. S1 C.P.C. came into being as a distinct entity in 1970 when the trustees’ committee was formed as an outgrowth of the Public Information Committee. In 1971, the Conference C.P.C. Committee was established. Today, many local communities, areas, and regions consider C.P.C. an activity separate from public information, treatment or corrections work. In some places, though, there is overlap. Members of C.P.C. committees inform professionals and future professionals about A.A.— what we are, where we are, what we can do, and what we cannot do. They attempt to establish better communication between A.A.s and professionals, and to find simple, effective ways of cooperating without affiliating.